The Internet of Cows

The IoT is a giant network of connected objects, including people. The analyst firm Gartner predicts that by 2020 there will be over 26 billion connected devices.

The IoT allows objects to be sensed and controlled remotely by a network infrastructure. More and more devices are being designed with wifi capabilities and sensors built-in to create a vast network of things.

Put simply, the IoT is made up of any device with an on and off switch to the internet. This includes anything from coffee makers and washing machines to smartphones and wearable devices such as Fitbits.

The internet of cows

The possibilities really are endless. An example of this is an IoT application that connects cows to the internet. Working with the National Trust, BT were able to monitor the cows’ location in order to prevent theft.

The IoT is not new, back in 2008 there were already more objects connected to the internet than people. In fact, the ATM is considered one of the first examples of an IoT object.

Transport is an obvious target for IoT investment. By 2020, a quarter of a billion vehicles will be connected to the internet, generating new possibilities for in-vehicle services and automated driving (Forbes). Virgin Atlantic are planning to connect a fleet of Boeing 787 aircrafts and cargo devices with IoT devices and sensors. Each connected plane is expected to produce over half a terabyte of data per flight.

A world of connections

The variety and extent of IoT is set to grow, creating more and more opportunities for direct integration between the physical world and computer-based systems. As a result of this interaction, businesses can improve efficiency, accuracy and productivity.

The IoT looks to become all-encompassing and for companies to take advantage of the data collected from the IoT, their ERP system needs to be flexible, intelligent and give real-time information.

This article excerpt originally appeared here: https://www.hso.com/uk/blog/de…